Winter Packing List (November-March)

  • Snow pants and jackets- you will probably do most of your activities in these, including horseback riding (remember that you do not generate very much heat when riding a horse, so you are only as warm as you start your ride)
  • Wool! Wool keeps you warm, even when wet, and does, in fact, wick moisture from your body. We love SmartWool here at the ranch (because it doesn’t itch like that old sweater grandma bought for you so many years ago!), but as long as it’s wool, you’re good. Be thinking especially about wool socks, they’ll help keep your toes warm while riding, and wool base layers.
    • Multiple layers are your best bet for staying warm- a great wool base layer, with fleece, flannel or down as a secondary layer (use down only if you’ll be covering it with a waterproof top layer), and then your ski clothing on top.
  • Snow gloves or mittens with a waterproof outer shell. Fleece is only comfortable when it’s dry, and when your kids are rolling around in the snow, those fleece gloves won’t last. If you prefer something thinner to ride in, we recommend Burton’s glove liners, which provide some thickness and warmth, without the bulk of a ski or snowboard glove.
  • Snow boots (insulated preferred)- you’ll be doing just about everything in these too. We say insulated preferred, because we can’t stress enough that you won’t be generating heat while riding, so insulated boots will be doing a little extra work for you!
    • Note- Uggs are very fashionable and most people love that they have the wonderful shearling lining, but their soles are SLICK, provide limited traction, thus making them impractical for walking around the ranch… and they aren’t water proof!
  • Ski goggles- we have our own private ski hill, and also provide complimentary shuttles to the 2 ski areas in the valley, but goggles are also a good idea for our hay meadow and downhill tubing, and for our afternoon sledding.
  • Warm hats and scarves and balaclava- while there are disagreements between how much heat we actually lose from our head, one thing is certain- your face, head and chest are most sensitive to temperature change, so covering them up will make you feel more comfortable.
    • Make sure that your hat covers your ears!
  • Dinners for Adults (Christmas and New Year’s only- all other winter dinners are family dinners)- although there is not a dress code, adult dinner attire in the winter has been described as Winter Chic- men usually wear jeans (or slacks) and a nice button down or sweater, and women have been seen in fur (faux or otherwise), jeans or leggings, ranchy/western dressy skirts and tops. The best we can say is: have a little fun with it- western up, and winterize your cocktail attire!
  • Dinners for Kids- no dress code here at all- dress them in warm layers as their after-dinner evening activities might be outdoors (night skate and a bonfire, for example), but might be indoors (hide-and-go-seek in the Patio House)
  • Your preferred sunscreen (we’re at about 8,500 ft, and that sun really reflects off the snow)
We provide the following:
  • Ice skates and hockey skates (plus hockey sticks)
  • Snowshoes
  • Cross Country skis and boots
  • A small selection of insulated boots, which we can provide for horseback riding only, so it would behoove you to bring your own for all day use.
  • Non-insulated slickers for riding (such as a windbreaker)